Burg Reuland

And speaking of knights (and I’m going to mention them quite often because we are in Western Europe), there is one little village in Eastern (German-speaking) Belgium carrying the name of the local noble family that had ruled the area until 1321 AD and whose most prominent member was the Knight Dietrich of Reuland.

There are heroic legends about him – mainly about his death: how he rose from his deathbed and drove back the Saracen by the siege of Acre during the Third Crusade in 1189 led by Frederick I Barbarossa. For his heroism, he earned the nickname ‘the Lion of Reuland’.

Burg Reuland

Burg Reuland (2)

Burg Reuland actually means Reuland Castle and this is the present restored version of the medieval fortress.

It was at first a Roman fort, then a Frankish castle, and the beginning of the last part of its history started at the end of the 10th century. It was the residence of the Reuland Family mentioned for the first time in the 12th century.

After the death of the last member of this family, it passed into the hands of another noble family – of Palandt. Two of its members were buried in sarcophagi in the Baroque Church of St. Stephen.

The church was erected in 1771.

Burg Reuland St.Stephanus

The portal of slate dates from 1772.

What makes that church remarkable is the high altar with a canopy in the form of a crown. It was crafted in 1750. From the same year date also the side altars.

To me, as a Bulgarian, it is quite remarkable how every little settlement in Western Europe has obligatory its well-preserved and promoted places of interests, and how in every little settlement, if there isn’t a tourist information office, then there is at least an information board placed at guests’ disposal. And the tourists are everywhere, even in places where I couldn’t find anything of great interest to photograph. Well, that doesn’t hold true for Burg Reuland whose castle is still a subject of numerous researches and excavations, as well as the historic figure of Dietrich of Reuland.

 

 

 

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