Hillesheim

The town of Hillesheim was mentioned for the first time in a document from AD 943 as a donation to the Abbey of Prüm, and today it is famous for the remains of its town walls dating back to around AD 1300.

Stadtbefestigung, Hillesheim (3)

The witch tower.

Personally, I have visited the town mainly due to the Church of St. Martin that contains remarkable masterpieces attributed to Hans Ruprecht Hofmann (one of the masters whose work I am showing on my blog. See: Trier – part 1 and 2, or Prüm) or to his workshop.

St. Martin, Hillesheim.jpg

The new church was built in 1852-1853, following a predecessor building from AD 1500, but it is assumed that there was a church in Hillesheim before the time of Charlemagne because its name St. Martin and its two patron saints – Martin of Tours and Archangel Michael suggest a long history beginning from the middle of the 5th century (as it is said on the website of the parish).

St. Martin, Hillesheim (2)

St. Martin, Hillesheim (5)

St. Martin, Hillesheim (6)

The sacrament altar from 1602 was donated by the Trier Archbishop-Elector Lothar von Metternich and was crafted by the prominent sculptor in question. The cross next to it was made in 1661 by an unknown master.

St. Martin, Hillesheim (7)

The side altar is also Hofmann’s work and dates from 1609.

St. Martin, Hillesheim (8)

Oil painting from 1610 with the Coronation of the Virgin.

St. Martin, Hillesheim (4)

The Baroque wooden pulpit from 1662.

St. Martin, Hillesheim (9)

The Pièta dates from 1662 too.

St. Martin, Hillesheim (3)

The Virgin in a Rose Wreath.

St. Martin, Hillesheim (10)

The Baroque organ case dates from 1772.

The Krimihotel and the Kriminalhaus. Hillesheim is a station on the Eifel Crime Fiction Hiking Trail based on books by crime fiction authors Jacques Berndorf and Ralf Kramp and is even the Germany’s capital of whodunit.

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